top of page

Weather Issues in Agriculture are a Problem, but Why?

We can be blunt about it — recently, farmers have been seeing weather changes featuring water shortages and water excess, which have put a complete strain on multiple regions in the U.S. that support the agriculture industry. Droughts in one area and too much rain in another have led to unfavorable conditions in crop production, putting heavy strains on the environment and our farmers.


Specifically speaking, American farmers in the West are constantly facing droughts. As the droughts intensify, regulators are reducing the availability of water to communities, including farms. The reduction in farming resources have been so extreme, it has even led to water theft in some cases — even for the most water-efficient of agricultural products.




Drought map of the U.S, Source: Drought.gov, NDMC, NOAA, USDA


Thanks to this, water rights have become a commodity — some farmers are even being forced to sell theirs. For crops that have no history of water use on newly acquired or repurposed land, difficulties arise; water rights aren’t a free-for-all, as farmers have to account for the wildlife, agricultural businesses, and communities that may also rely on the resource on their property.


However, in the opposite region, there is the opposite problem. In the East, they have too much rain, and this excess in moisture implies disease and pest pressure in crops. Lo and behold, these plants have to adapt to survive, and therefore these changes in characteristics are ultimately changing the type of crops that customers are expecting to consume.


With the ever-changing climate and unpredictable weather patterns, there needs to be a more sustainable approach to agriculture to prevent these same issues from happening in the future. These are the kind of problems that aeroponic methods are best suited to address.


True aeroponic growing systems suspend the root system of a plant completely in the air. The roots receive their nutrient-rich water solution at specified intervals in the form of aerated micro-droplets or fine mist. Unlike hydroponics, the roots are never submerged in or by flowing water, and therefore do not require much water to operate at all.


At Bifarm, we’re doing what we can to address the constant environmental changes and challenges that farmers face. We aim to produce consistent and high-quality plants with the most efficient use of water, energy, and space. Bifarm’s Future Farm solution is a combination of hardware and software built to address modern farming needs and the shift towards agricultural sustainability — including less water and energy usage through the use of aeroponics and advanced indoor climate controls.


Bifarm’s Future Farm best fits food production in the urban areas where resources such as water and energy are scarce and arable land is not easily available. The digital management grow environment would also provide consistent harvest against climate and logistic disruption, therefore, providing secure food for the urban population in both wet and dry climates thanks to its precision indoor climate control capabilities.


Another added benefit of the Bifarm Future Farm system is the projected usage of energy in 32 sq ft. of growing space uses about 35W energy, which is dramatically different from other solutions that typically require a 5-ton chiller plus high-power pumps.


At Bifarm, we’re doing what we can to address the constant environmental changes and challenges that farmers face. We aim to produce consistent and high-quality plants with the most efficient use of water, energy, and space. If you’re interested to see what else we have to offer, check out our website.


Interested to be a part of the farmers making a difference? Here’s our assessment form if you want to know how to integrate Future Farm into your practice.